Hackers Demand Millions From HBO or Game of Thrones Leaks Continue

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As expected HBO will deny giving ransom and hackers will leak more episodes of HBO's shows. HBO first acknowledged that its systems had been compromised in a July 29 email to its 2,500-plus employees, followed by a second email the next day that warned staff to avoid risky email behaviors.

The latest release from the hacking group, which refers to itself as little.finger66, included technical data about HBO's internal network, administrator passwords, draft scripts from a number of Game of Thrones episodes - including the episode set to air Sunday - and communications from HBO's vice president for film programming, Leslie Cohen.

At that time, no one really knew what the motive was behind the cyber crime.

In a video directed to HBO CEO Richard Plepler, the hackers — who use the pseudonym "Mr. Smith" — used white text on a black background to threaten further disclosures if HBO doesn't pay up. All the script pages were said to be watermarked with the hacker's motto, 'HBO is falling'.

Numerous more than 50 internal documents in the dump were labeled "confidential", including a spreadsheet of legal claims against the network, job offer letters to several top executives, slides discussing future technology plans and a list of 37,977 emails called "Richard's Contact list", an apparent reference to Plepler. To stop the leaks, the purported hackers demanded "our 6 month salary in bitcoin", which they implied is at least $6 million.

The video letter, written by a certain 'Mr.

The group has claimed they are earning US$12m to US$15m a year from breaching data of organisations. HBO spends 12 million for Market Research and 5 million for GOT7 advertisements. Another curated batch of leaked files has now appeared online, revealing more Game of Thrones spoilers, marketing plans, and other confidential HBO files. "Find yourself another budget for your advertisements!", they. "You only have 3 days to make a decision so decide wisely".

The note reportedly ended with an image of GoT villain the Night King with his arms raised, the word "standing" in one hand and "falling" in the other.

Do you think HBO will give in to the hackers and pay the ransom?

In a separate incident, a Game of Thrones episode was leaked last week before going public.

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