'Shame On You': Protesters Meet Trump Supporters Ahead Of Phoenix Rally

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Love said she hopes Trump does pardon Arpaio, who she said she believes he has "done a lot for this state".

Trump told a Fox News interviewer last week that he was considering a pardon for Arpaio, who was voted out of office previous year.

"I'm confident that they will use every resource (they have) to keep people safe, but there is simply no way to guarantee anyone's safety", Perez said.

As President Trump travels to the West today for the first time since the election, the stage has been set in downtown Phoenix for what could be a political barn burner. Other protests are expected with the prospect of a pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

In the days leading up to the rally in Phoenix on Tuesday night, there was talk of whether the president might announce the issuance of the first pardon of his presidency at the rally. Any move to do so soon would come far earlier than former presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, who each waited nearly two years into their terms before granting an initial pardon.

In a news conference at Trump Tower, President Donald Trump blamed the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12, 2017 on both sides of the conflict, equating the white supremacists on one side with the "alt-left" on the other side.

A judge ruled last month that the former sheriff had committed a crime by flouting the order not to detain suspected undocumented immigrants in a decision that was widely seen as a rebuke of a law enforcement officials whose tactics - including housing immigrants in a tent city and forcing detainees to wear pink underwear - had always been controversial.

The rally, scheduled for 7 p.m.

Trump will need the support of Congress to advance his immigration agenda and particularly the border wall before September 30, when the United States government runs out of funds. You don't think we've heard it all?

A poll conducted over the weekend by OH Predictive Insights found that only 21 percent of Arizonans support a pardon of Arpaio. Stanton said that the country "is still healing" and that Trump would further division.

Arpaio told NBC News earlier Tuesday the decision not to pardon him in Phoenix was "their decision - right now".

Arpaio made a name for himself as the so-called "toughest sheriff" in the country for his approach to undocumented immigration. His office has reportedly ignored over 400 sex-crime cases, targeted Latino residents and neighborhoods, stalked Latina women and retaliated against those who criticized Arpaio.

Flake - who took on Trump in a new book, "Conscience of a Conservative" - wouldn't respond Monday morning after an East Valley Chambers of Commerce breakfast to questions about Trump's tweet last week that Flake is "a non-factor in the Senate" and "toxic!"

Neither John McCain nor Jeff Flake, Arizona's senators, was expected to attend the Phoenix event, said a source familiar with Flake's re-election campaign and published reports, underscoring Trump's fractious relationship with some in his own party.

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