Cancer survivor Christina Applegate underwent another secret preventative surgery

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Speaking with Today for an article published on October 11, 2017, Christina Applegate revealed that she'd had an operation just two weeks earlier to remove her ovaries and her fallopian tubes. "My cousin passed away from ovarian cancer in 2008".

In the video player above, Dr. Oz explains medically why Applegate would have made the decision to have her ovaries and Fallopian tube removed and offers advice for women who may have the BRCA 1 gene.

Since the star, who has a six-year-old daughter, is BRCA positive, which means a person is more likely to develop ovarian and breast cancers, she chose to have another procedure to decrease her chances of dying from cancer.

Interviewed on October 11, by the site Today, the actress of 45 years was, therefore, entrusted to you for the first time at this topic, revealing that the operation had taken place "two weeks ago". She is also a vegetarian and said she had reduced her stress. It is like that that I chose to take control. That's one other thing off the table. "Now, let's hope that I won't be knocked down by a bus", joked the former star of the series Married with children. "The chances of my daughter being positive for the BRCA are very high. I'm doing everything I can on my end knowing that in 20 years, she'll have to start getting tested", she shared.

Admittedly, the Anchorman actress worries about her 6-year-old daughter Sadie. The other big killer is stress. I look at her and feed her the cleanest foods. Hopefully by then there will be advancements. "It breaks my heart to think that's a possibility".

"We're a 100-percent-organic house". That's her choice, ' Applegate said. "We're really conscious about what we buy", she added. Right now, you get to start over, and right now you get to change everything - the way that you deal with things in life, the way that you react to things. "I'm not anymore. I try to find the lining in everything in life", she said.

Certain women have higher chances of developing ovarian cancer than others, including middle-aged women, women who have previously had breast or colon cancer - such as Applegate - and some women who have trouble getting pregnant.

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