Justice Dept. gives 'last chance' for sanctuary cities to comply

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Eddie Johnson and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, along with a handful of other so-called sanctuary cities around the country, come as Mayor Rahm Emanuel continues a federal court fight with Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Section 8 U.S.C. s. 1373 says that a state "may not prohibit, or in any way restrict, any government entity or official from sending to, or receiving from, the Immigration and Naturalization Service information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual".

Cities on the attorney general's warning list include New York, Philadelphia and New Orleans, as well as Chicago and surrounding Cook County in IL.

Sessions subsequently issued a memo that limited the categories of federal funding that would be in jeopardy to DOJ or Department of Homeland Security grants. Chicago won a ruling over the department last month over an earlier threat to withhold public safety funding.

In a notice reviewed by Fox News, the DOJ announced that five jurisdictions "have preliminarily been found to have laws, policies, or practices that may violate" a key federal statute concerning cooperation with federal immigration officials. The Byrne grant applications "required you to comply" with the federal rules, according to the letters dated Wednesday from Acting Assistant Attorney General Alan Hanson and posted on the Justice Department Website.

Additionally, the Justice Department said subsequent investigations found Miami-Dade County, Fla., and Clark County, Nev., where Las Vegas is located, were already in accordance with federal immigration law, though previously they had been listed otherwise.

Sessions' Justice Department made a point of noting the feds found no evidence of non-compliance with Wisconsin's Milwaukee County, along with CT.

The city has two weeks to write back to the Department. ". We urge jurisdictions to not only comply with Section 1373 but to establish sensible and effective partnerships to properly process criminal aliens".

The jurisdictions have until October 27 to show they don't have any codes or policies preventing local law enforcement from cooperating with federal immigration authorities.

In April, a presidential executive order that would have cut off funds to sanctuary cities was stymied by a judge's order.

But, the process might not be as smooth for the jurisdictions facing that October 27 deadline.

Former Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, long outspoken in support of hardline immigration policies, left his post in August to become a top advisor to the pro-Trump super PAC America First Action.

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