Iranian Foreign Ministry rejects Macron's call for missile talks

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France, the Foreign Ministry speaker said, is "fully aware of our country's intangible position concerning the issue of Iran's defensive affairs, which are not negotiable".

Later in the day, Macron made a surprise visit to Saudi Arabia, where he said he was "very concerned" about Iran's ballistic missile program, adding, "There are negotiations we need to start on Iran's ballistic missiles". Previously, Paris voiced its commitment to the agreement, favoring new nuclear negotiations after 2025, when some of the provisions expire.

"We expect France not to get inculcated by the wrong instructions of some Persian Gulf states against the Islamic Republic of Iran", said Qassemi after urging French President Macron to be fair, realistic, and far-sighted in dealing with the developments of the sensitive regions of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf.

Earlier in the week, Saudi Arabia had blamed Iran for a missile strike on its soil from neighboring Yemen and had said there would be a response "in the appropriate time and manner".

The incident is a "part of this ballistic activity of Iran in the region, which is not covered by the [nuclear] deal", Macron told the Times.

Iran denies the allegations and says its missiles are needed for self-defense and that its nuclear program has purely peaceful aims.

"France officials including its president are well aware that levelling false accusations against the Islamic Republic of Iran stands in stark contradiction to the realities of the Middle East over the past decades", Qassemi responded. Iranian state media did not immediately report on Macron's remarks.

Macron met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman later on November 9 and "expressed France's condemnation of targeting Riyadh city by a ballistic missile", according to the state-run Saudi Press Agency.

U.S. President Donald Trump has threatened to pull out of the deal, refusing to recertify that Iran is complying with its obligations and violating the "spirit" of the accord. The move faced a serious backlash back then, including from France, which stated it would stick to the deal.

Iran's nuclear deal saw sanctions imposed on Tehran lifted in exchange for limits on its atomic program. But the French leader stressed it was also necessary to have a dialogue with Iran on other strategic issues, including Tehran's ballistic missile program and regional security, a proposal ruled out by Iran.

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