How Australia Voted In The Same-Sex Marriage Survey

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SYDNEY == The head of Australia's marriage equality push has slammed calls for anti-discrimination exemptions to be legalised under the guise of "religious freedoms" in the event of a yes vote in the postal survey, claiming such moves would be against the spirit of the support for the reform.

"After a cost of $122 million, and over two months of campaigning and years of public discussion, it makes no sense to delay a parliamentary debate".

Almost 80 per cent of eligible Australians took part in the voluntary poll, a return rate that compares more than favourably with the 91 per cent who voted at the compulsory 2016 federal election.

"Certainly the government would not countenance making legal discrimination that is illegal, that is unlawful, today", he said.

"I hope Malcolm Turnbull shows some spine on this, I really do", she said. Any amendments to the bill will be reserved for that sitting week.

On Sunday the Liberal MP Trent Zimmerman warned that religious freedom was a separate issue to same-sex marriage.

Paterson's bill would allow a wide range of service providers, religious or secular, to turn away gay couples asking for wedding services.

A handful of ministers backed the sentiments expressed in Senator Paterson's rival bill, including Resources Minister Matthew Canavan and Assistant Treasurer Michael Sukkar, who have supported the "no" side.

Mr Goodenough said the alternative Bill could also be introduced into the Senate this week.

A private member's bill amending the Marriage Act will be introduced, and members of Parliament will be given a 'free vote, ' which means they can vote according to their own personal conscience, instead of having to agree with their political party's beliefs.

The Paterson bill is expected to enjoy substantial support from that quarter as it implements demands from Tony Abbott, Matt Canavan, Michael Sukkar, Zed Seselja, Andrew Hastie, Eric Abetz and Kevin Andrews. But then after the marriage ceremony, the Bill remains silent on what happens if, say, a school teaches that marriage is between a man and a woman. Law Council of Australia president Fiona McLeod said his proposal "goes well beyond the issue of marriage in a number of crucial respects". "This Bill will encroach on many of these protections in an extraordinary and perilous way", she said in a statement.

It also allows religious organisations to refuse to make goods and services for the objective of a marriage.

"They can be debated ... but they shouldn't be confused with this bill which is created to deliver marriage equality".

Results will be released this Wednesday the 15th in Canberra at 10am (AEDT) and aired live on ABC and SBS.

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