Rep says Congress paid out $15M to silence sex harassment victims

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Speier, who revealed her own history of being sexually harassed when she was a staffer on the Hill, is calling for mandatory harassment training for all members and staffers.

"There are two members of Congress, Republican and Democrat, right now, who serve, who have been subject to review or not have been subject to review, but have engaged in sexual harassment", said Speier.

"Our goal is not only to raise awareness, but also make abundantly clear that harassment in any form has no place in this institution", Mr Ryan said in a statement.

The move came hours after two female lawmakers testified about sexual misconduct involving unnamed sitting members of Congress.

"Today's hearing was another important step in our efforts to combat sexual harassment and ensure a safe workplace", Ryan said. He opened the door in only a towel, invited the staffer inside, and proceeded to expose himself. All they ask in return as staff members is to be able to work in a hostile-free work environment.

"What are we doing for women right now who are dealing with somebody like that?" she asked.

During testimony before the Committee on House Administration on Tuesday, Representative Jackie Speier (D-CA) stated there are two current members of Congress, one Republican, and one Democrat who have sexually harassed people. The survivor then must sign an NDA and agree to mandatory mediation.

She is also crafting another bill to overhaul the process available for staff to file harassment complaints with Office of Compliance, which she says discourages victims from coming forward. She did not identify the lawmakers. Though Congress has insulated itself against harassment allegations to a degree, harassment still exists, and one Congresswoman is speaking out.

Gloria Lett, counsel for the Office of House Employment Counsel, testified that she had also heard similar concerns, but hiring based on gender would be discrimination and therefore illegal.

With each passing day, new revelations of sexual misconduct continue to rock the political sphere. "They want the system fixed and the perpetrators held accountable". Ryan and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell have urged Moore to drop out of the race.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said women are "nowhere near where we should be" in workplaces across the country - including the Senate.

"You wonder why there's only 21 women in the Senate or why there's no women running Hollywood studios or there's hardly any women running major businesses", Klobuchar told reporters.

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