Cathay Pacific crew witnessed North Korea missile test

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The first airline recently to take such a safety precaution was Singapore Airlines, which confirmed a flight path for its route between Incheon Airport and Los Angeles was changed after North Korea's missile launch on July 27 earlier this year.

The U.S. military reportedly detected preparations for North Korea's most recent missile launch at least 72 hours prior, according to The Diplomat, citing U.S. intelligence sources.

The representative of the Ministry of defense Colonel Robert manning reported that the missile flew about 1,000 km before falling into the sea of Japan, reports Reuters.

Cathay Pacific also reported that one of its crews flying from San Francisco to Hong Kong reported witnessing the apparent re-entry of the ICBM.

"There are no current routes that fly through a risky zone", said an Asiana Airlines official.

North Korea has tested an Intercontinental ballistic missile, which posed no threat to the U.S. and its allies, said the Pentagon.

On July 28 an Air France flight from Tokyo to Paris, carrying 323 people, passed just 60 miles from the splashdown site of a North Korean missile test, roughly five to ten minutes after it hit the water.

The North Korean missile was sacked very high up, reaching an altitude of 4,475 kilometers (2,780 miles) before falling back into the Sea of Japan about 950 kilometers (600 miles) from where it was launched.

The ICBM was sacked on a lofted trajectory rather than a minimum energy trajectory, putting more structural stress on the missile's re-entry vehicle but reducing the duration and intensity of temperature-based stresses.

In response to the launch, President Trump said the United States will "take care of it".

North Korea does not announce its tests beforehand unlike other countries.

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