Woody Allen's daughter outraged her abuse allegations have been ignored

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"In this deliberately created fog, A-list actors agree to appear in Allen's films and journalists tend to avoid the subject", she said.

The legendary actress had split with the famed director after having discovered he was having an affair with her adopted daughter, Soon-Yi Previn.

While the #MeToo movement has sparked the takedowns of many powerful predators in Hollywood, one accuser has still not seen the justice she has so long deserved.

"Why is it that Harvey Weinstein and other accused celebrities have been cast out by Hollywood, while Allen recently secured a multimillion-dollar distribution deal with Amazon, greenlit by former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price before he was suspended over sexual misconduct allegations", Farrow writes. "Further, we believe that Dylan's statements on videotape and her statements to us during our evaluation do not refer to actual events that occurred to her on August 4th, 1992", the date Farrow alleged Allen molested her. It's important that we don't stand for this and that we don't focus on one or two or three or four stories, it's important that we focus on humanity in general and say, 'This is unacceptable.' " But on the subject of Allen, she said, "It's very risky to factor in things you don't know anything about.

Allen has written strong roles for women in the past, but in this case the best I can say is that he's written Winslet lots of words, repetitive reams of them, all expressive of Ginny's anxiety.

Dylan writes, "It breaks my heart when women and men I admire work with Allen, then refuse to answer questions about it". The high point of "Wonder Wheel" comes when Winslet's Ginny finds herself staring into her bedroom mirror as she brushes her hair and practices her confession to Mickey the lifeguard. As the actor in the film, you just have to step away and say, I don't know anything, really, and whether any of it is true or false.

No other allegations of sexual misconduct have come out against Allen, but Dylan says her accusation shouldn't be invalidated or ignored just because it is "still just too complicated, too hard, too 'dangerous, ' to use [Blake] Lively's term, to confront".

"Allen's pattern of inappropriate behavior - putting his thumb in my mouth, climbing into bed with me in his underwear, constant grooming and touching - was witnessed by friends and family members".

Farrow ended her piece by stating that the "system" worked for Weinstein, and it still works for Allen as well. In a November interview with Terry Gross on NPR's Fresh Air, Gerwig said in response to a question about Allen: "I think I'm living in that space of fear of being anxious about how I talk about it and what I say".

"I think on some level Woody is a woman". I remember them. She was distraught when I told her. (It felt more like bad Arthur Miller to me, maybe "A View from the Ferris Wheel?") There's a generous reading of the movie going around suggesting that this all might be an intentionally lousy play penned by our novice narrator, but I'm not buying it.

Speaking of Bullets Over Broadway, which garnered seven Oscar noms in the wake of sexual abuse allegations against him (yeah, like the Academy cared), there's not much of a whiff of Allen's creepiness here.

In the op-ed, Farrow draws parallels between Allen and Weinstein in how they reportedly responded to the allegations. Farrow called out actresses Blake Lively, Kate Winslet, and Greta Gerwig, who have publicy distanced themselves from Weinsten but continue to work closlely woth Allen. Also, Allen wasn't convicted because of an acquittal; instead, as Farrow stated in her op-ed, the CT state prosecutor had "probable cause" to try the case in 1993, but opted to spare a "child victim" the trauma of a trial. "But the revolution has been selective". The movie is categorically uninterested in any type of introspection or exploration; it hoists up trite character types and then lets them limply dangle, a tactic that might work if Allen spiced it up with any of his trademark one-liners.

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