Breast cancer survival 'unaffected' by presence of faulty gene

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About 12 percent of the patients had a BRCA mutation, yet again confirming the association between this "faulty gene" and breast cancer.

Fiona MacNeill, of the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, who was not involved in the research, said: "This study can reassure young women with breast cancer, particularly those with triple negative cancer or who are BRCA carriers, that breast conservation with radiotherapy is a safe option in the first decade after diagnosis and double mastectomy is not essential or mandatory at initial treatment".

'We are delighted that the FDA has approved olaparib for advanced breast cancer in women who have inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, ' said Professor Andrew Tutt, director of the Breast Cancer Now Research Cancer in the United Kingdom, which played a pivotal role in developing the drug.

Located within Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center, The Basser Research Center for BRCA focuses exclusively on BRCA1 and BRCA2.

"Our data provides some reassurance that patients who are diagnosed with a BRCA gene fault as part of their cancer treatment journey can complete and recover from their breast cancer treatment, which is important".

Young women with breast cancer who carry faulty BRCA genes are no less likely to survive than those without them, researchers have found.

The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes usually produce molecules inside cells that help to fix DNA.

The National Cancer Institute estimates that about 253,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and that more than 40,000 will die of the disease.

The agency said its approval was based on a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 advanced breast cancer patients with BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutations. The primary outcome was overall survival for all BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers compared with all non-carriers at 2, 5, and 10 years post-diagnosis. The mutations put women at greater risk of breast and ovarian cancers, with 45 to 90 per cent of women with the mutation developing breast cancer during their lifetime.

After the women's medical records were tracked for up to ten years, researchers found that 651 of 678 total deaths were due to breast cancer.

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cleared the first treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer caused by BRCA mutations, which are genetic defects that raise the risk of malignancies.

This surgery did not appear to improve their chances of survival at the 10-year mark. These findings remained similar regardless of whether mutations were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.

Professor Peter Fasching, from Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, added: "This important topic needs more prospective research as preventive surgical measures might have an effect on what might be a very long life after a diagnosis of breast cancer at a young age".

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