US, Pakistan trade angry charges as relations falter

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Trump had also accused Pakistan of providing "safe haven" to terrorists in return for United States dollars 33 billion aid over the last 15 years. They work with us at times, and they also harbour the terrorists that attack our troops in Afghanistan.

Pakistan is ready to face any US action in the wake of President Donald Trump's tweet on New Year's Day threatening the country, the defense minister and the army spokesman said.

On Monday, US President Donald Trump posted a tweet saying that the US "foolishly" gave aid to Pakistan over the course of 15 years but the country remained deceitful by providing safe havens to terrorists from Afghanistan.

Lisa Curtis, who is the director for South and Central Asia on Trump's National Security Council, co-authored an article with former Pakistani ambassador Husain Haqqani previous year which said that the "activities and operations of diverse terror groups on and from Pakistani soil, and the government's failure to rein them in, threaten vital United States national security interests in the region". Pakistan left its sources running dry for the sake of the war on terrorism that the U.S. required the nation to fight, he added.

In countering USA criticism, Pakistan says it has launched military operations to push out militants from its soil and that 17,000 Pakistanis have died fighting militants or in bombings and other attacks since 2001.

Washington has signalled to Pakistan that it will cut aid and enact other punitive measures if Islamabad does not stop helping or turning a blind eye to the Haqqani network militants who carry out cross-border attacks in Afghanistan.

Geng when questioned relating Trump's tweet and that how would that would affect China's struggles for bringing peace to Pakistan, he remarked that they believe China, Afghanistan and Pakistan are neighbours and hence they are not only related geographically but also have common interests.

According to a readout from a meeting of Pakistan's National Security Committee held on Tuesday, the body noted its "deep disappointment with some of the recent statements" by Mr. Trump. Assistance to Pakistan has always been framed as incentive for Pakistan to do more in the fight on terror. As recently as October, President Trump voiced optimism over relations with Pakistan, saying the USA was being "respected again" following Pakistan's compliance with a rescue operation that saw an American woman and her family released after years of captivity with a group linked to the Taliban.

On Monday in a series of tweets, Trump accused Pakistan of "nothing but lies and deceit" concerning its counterterrorism operations and has since been widely condemned for the statement.

The White House is set to announce a major cut of security assistance aid to Pakistan for its continued support of terrorist organizations, Reuters reports.

In 2016, the then-Taliban leader Mullah Mansour was killed by a USA drone strike inside Pakistan and in 2011, al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was found and killed by U.S. troops in the Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad.

Withholding $255 million, however, may not be enough he noted, and "President Trump may have to go farther than cutting off aid to get to that point".

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