Launch delay for NASA's newest planet-hunting spacecraft

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If the launch is delayed, another window opens tomorrow at 6:13 pm ET.

"On average the stars that TESS observes are 30-100 times brighter and 10 times closer than the stars that Kepler focused on".

The satellite known as Tess will survey nearly the entire sky, staring at the brightest, closest stars in an effort to find any planets that might be encircling them.

Nasa predicts that TESS will discover 20,000 exoplanets - or planets outside the solar system - including more than 50 Earth-sized planets and up to 500 planets less than twice the size of Earth.

According to a report by Space.com, NASA's current exoplanet hunting observatory named Kepler, has nearly exhausted its fuel supply, requiring NASA to put TESS into orbit to continue research.

The satellite will look for transits or occasional light-blocking events that result due to the presence of a planet orbiting a star, according to a statement from NASA.

That said, it is worth noting TESS won't find life on any of these worlds.

This meant a hard time for the astronomers studying the identified planet. It will do this by monitoring more than 200,000 bright host stars. Once these exoplanets are detected, using the known planet size, orbit and mass, TESS and ground-based follow-up team will be able to determine the planets' compositions. It will divide the sky into 26 different sectors and monitor each for at least 27 days in order to cover the complete zone.

"TESS forms a bridge from what we have learned about exoplanets to date and where we are headed in the future", said Jeff Volosin, TESS project manager at NASA's Goddard Spaceflight Center.

NASA TV and SpaceX both will be live streaming the launch of the satellite.

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