Four more die in E.Coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce

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That being said, the CDC continues to investigate the outbreak and warned that new cases from May could still come to light due to a three-week lag in reporting.

Health officials have tied the E. coli outbreak, the largest in a decade, to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona. At least 89 people were hospitalized. On Friday, health officials said they have learned of four more - two in Minnesota and one each in Arkansas and NY. In a June 1 advisory, the agency said that four additional deaths were reported in Arkansas, North Carolina and NY in addition to the original death in California.

The first illnesses occurred in March, and the most recent began on May 12, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Numerous new cases were people who became ill two to three weeks ago, when contaminated lettuce was still being sold.

The CDC said that some of the affected people had not eaten lettuce, but had contact with others who had fallen ill.

Meanwhile, government authorities are still trying to figure out how and why the outbreak happened.

Romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region in Arizona is thought to be the source of the latest outbreak, although the Food and Drug Administration said no single grower, distributor or region could account for the spread. The lettuce was harvested on April 16, 2018 and harvest season is now over.

As of May 30 the investigation figures show 197 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 35 states. Symptoms can include bloody diarrhea, vomiting and severe stomach cramps.

While most people recover within a week, some illnesses can last longer and be more severe, the CDC cautioned.

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