Season's 1st tropical storm forms in eastern Pacific

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Taken together, these two studies suggest that climate change is already increasing the dangers posed by hurricanes and typhoons in far more ways than previously thought, and it will continue to compound numerous hazards, especially the threat of severe flooding.

Researchers claim that as the planet's poles heat up, pressure gradients around the world are changing, reducing the winds that push on these storms.

The effect has been more profound north of the equator, with the western North Pacific Ocean one of the most hard hit regions.

According to the study by Dr Jim Kossin from the National Centers for Environmental Information, tropical cyclones have slowed in both hemispheres and in every ocean basin except the Northern Indian Ocean.

The study published in Nature this week by United States weather experts shows the problem weather systems are taking longer to travel across the planet.

Kossin's work was based on details of nearly 70 years' worth of storms, but he made no attempt to determine what was causing the slowdown. Between 1949 and 2016, tropical cyclone translation speeds declined 10 percent worldwide, the study says.

Climate change is tinkering with and slowing down atmospheric circulation patterns - the wind currents that move weather along, Kossin said.

Previous research has shown that a warmer climate can hold more water moisture, so when it rains, it rains more.

Dr Kossin said more rain was also falling during cyclones, and there was evidence that tropical cyclones were migrating more towards the poles.

"The poles tend to become disproportionately warmer than the tropics do under global warming", Kossin said.

Dr Christina Patricola, from the Climate and Ecosystems Sciences Division at University California, Davis, says the findings raise several questions, especially regarding "stalled" tropical cyclones. But here was a 10 percent slowdown in storm movement speed with only a half- degree Celsius (.9 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming globally over the period he studied.

Kossin concluded that the trend has all the signs of human-induced climate change.

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