North Korea summit: Trump, Pompeo defend language in joint statement

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he expects North Korea to take the major steps toward nuclear disarmament during Donald Trump's first term, as the US president tweeted that there's "no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea".

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un have shared a historic handshake as they meet for the first time.

Jimmy Kimmel opened his "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" monologue on Tuesday night by laying into President Trump over his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

But the vaguely worded document did not clearly address the North's current nuclear arsenal, estimated to be as many as 60 bombs, or its numerous shorter- and longer-range missiles, including weapons believed capable of striking much of the continental United States.

The declaration signed at the end of the summit said the two countries would co-operate towards "new relations", while the U.S. would provide "security guarantees" to North Korea.

While hopes were high ahead of the first-ever meeting between a sitting US president and a North Korean leader, expectations of what the summit could produce fell in the days leading up to the meeting.

But he said that was no longer the case, and everyone can "sleep well tonight".

Trump agreed to end joint U.S.

At their first summit in April, South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korea's Kim Jong Un pledged to take a number of steps to promote Korean reconciliation.

"All of our members have served in combat and we understand the importance of bring our war dead home to bring closure to families", said Veterans of Foreign Wars National Commander Keith Harman.

Trump's chest-thumping tweets seemed reminiscent of the "Mission Accomplished" banner flown behind President George W. Bush in 2003 when he spoke aboard a Navy ship following the US invasion of Iraq.

In his tweets on Wednesday, Trump also defended a major concession made to North Korea while he was in Singapore: that the United States would halt joint military exercises with South Korean forces on the Korean Peninsula.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo arrived in South Korea on Wednesday to discuss details of how denuclearisation could be achieved.

Pompeo, speaking to reporters in Seoul on Wednesday, sought to quell criticism that North Korea didn't make any major commitments at the summit in Singapore.

Kim at one point told Trump that many people around the world would see their meeting as a kind of fantasy, as if it the event was a "science fiction movie".

In Pyongyang, North Korean state media heralded claims of a victorious meeting with the US president; photos of him standing side-by-side with Trump on the world stage were splashed across newspapers.

"I must have had just countless calls and letters and tweets, anything you can do - they want the remains of their sons back", he said.

As Mr Trump returned to the US, he tweeted that Pyongyang no longer posed a nuclear threat - despite critics saying the US President's comments were premature.

As Trump acknowledged that denuclearization would not be accomplished overnight, the North suggested Wednesday that Trump had moved away from his demand for complete denuclearization before US sanctions on the long-isolated country are removed. Add North Korea as an interest to stay up to date on the latest North Korea news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

"We had a historic meeting and made a decision to leave the past behind", Kim said as he and Trump signed the joint statement, adding, "The world will see a major change". "And the issue is now, where do we go from here - whether we can maintain momentum from the summit and start putting flesh on those bones".

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