Trump Admin Favored Corporations In Opposing Breastfeeding Resolution

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The Times reported that the USA effort this spring during the United Nations -affiliated world health meeting was largely unsuccessful and that most of the original wording remained.

"The failing NY Times Fake News story today about breast feeding must be called out".

When U.S. efforts to water down the measure failed, the delegates reportedly threatened Ecuadorian delegates with retaliatory trade measures and said the U.S. would withdraw military aid unless the country withdrew the measure.

The president's tweet was a direct response to an article published by The New York Times on Sunday, titled "U.S. Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution Stuns World Health Officials." .

But U.S. officials tried to remove language from the resolution that called on governments to "protect, promote and support breastfeeding", according to reporter Andrew Jacobs. The Department of Health and Human Services, the lead agency in the effort to modify the resolution, explained the decision to contest the resolution's wording but said HHS was not involved in threatening Ecuador. "These women should have the choice and access to alternatives for the health of their babies, and not be stigmatized for the ways in which they are able to do so".

World Health Organization representatives when those initiatives were first introduced by a delegation from Ecuador, the New York Times reported on 8 July 2018.

The Americans did not threaten Moscow as they did Ecuador and other countries, according to the Times.

'We're not trying to be a hero here, but we feel that it is wrong when a big country tries to push around some very small countries, especially on an issue that is really important for the rest of the world, ' the diplomat said. It simply said that mother's milk is the healthiest option for babies, and countries should seek to reduce inaccurate or misleading advertising about infant formula.

Patti Randall - who, as policy director of the British advocacy group Baby Milk Action, has attended meetings of the assembly - said the group was "astonished", "appalled" and "saddened" by the behavior of the USA delegates.

The State Department would not answer the Times' questions.

A 2016 statement passed uncontroversially at WHO's 69th assembly affirmed the organization's position that "the lives of more 820,000 children could be saved every year if all mothers followed [the WHO's] advice to start breastfeeding within an hour of birth, give only breast milk for the first six months, and continue breastfeeding until their children reach the age of two alongside appropriate complementary foods".

Companies that sell baby formula generate $70billion annually, but those sales have been stagnant due to the increased popularity of breastfeeding. The Ecuadorean government quickly acquiesced.

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