Americans advised to 'keep low profile' during Trump visit to the UK

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As reported by AOL, an alert issued by the United States Embassy to the United Kingdom in London on Tuesday, July 10, warns us citizens to "keep a low profile" whilst overseas in the greater British Isles during President Trump's scheduled visit.

President Trump will head to London on Friday, where he's expected to face protests at every turn.

"Donald Trump likes to pose as an global tough guy, but it looks like he's too scared to face protesters in London".

Johnson has told reporters that Americans respected peaceful protest.

The US president appears unpopular in Britain, where his brash style and hardline "America First" policies have caused consternation across the political spectrum and society.

Last month, Labour member of Parliament Gavin Shuker ran down a list of objections to Trump: the separation of migrant families and detention of children; the US departure from the United Nations' Human Rights Council; the USA president's praise for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Following the incident and several other diplomatic spats, his first trip to Britain since taking power was repeatedly delayed and scaled back, with speculation it has now been created to avoid the demonstrations. "The president is merely trying to get as impactful a trip as he can get in a 24-hour period".

It urges demonstrators to 'be prepared to take to the streets in the most incredible protest in our history'.

One of the biggest attractions for the Friday protest will be a giant, orange baby Donald Trump balloon that will float above the city.

Mt Trump refused to endorse Ms May as prime minister and heaped praise on his "friend" Boris Johnson a day after he quit as foreign secretary. "If the president wants to do something, we'll make it possible".

"For a United States president who retweets far-right Britain First propaganda, insults Londoners at times of tragedy, and refuses to condemn white supremacist marches at home, this insult is well deserved" said Labour MP David Lammy.

Yet according to David Wemer of the Atlantic Council, a new USA -U.K. trade deal isn't a high priority for the Trump administration.

National newspapers have reported that as many as 10,000 police officers will be part of plans - named Operation Manifold - to protect the president and deal with predicted protests.

Trump is not expected to spend time in central London.

On Friday he will visit PM Theresa May at Chequers, set to be followed by a meeting with Her Majesty The Queen at Windsor Castle.

The small gathering at a location to be confirmed in London - and at which Mr Trump is not expected to attend - is likely to be easily outnumbered by protesters involved in a series of demonstrations organised for the coming days, including the flying of a 20ft-high Trump inflatable near Parliament.

A national demonstration is planned at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh on Saturday, as well as a "Carnival of Resistance" in the Meadows area of the capital.

It is not simply the protesters, who are expected to dog Trump throughout his visit, including his weekend in Scotland, but his fraught relationship with political leaders accustomed to harmonious exchanges with USA leaders, a tradition of unity that goes back at least to the vital World War II partnership of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill.

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