Disney Streaming Service Won't Include Pre-2019 Star Wars Films

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They also have the Netflix name all over them, so it won't be easy for Disney to take them.

However, a recent New York Times report says Disney has been working on a live-action Star Wars show, which will be exclusive to its streaming service.

Disney is opening up its wallet to beef up its 2019 streaming service offerings.

Considering that CBS All Access's Star Trek: Discovery was one of the most expensive shows in TV history with a budget of between $8 million and $8.5 million per episode then it becomes apparent just how much Disney is investing in both Favreau's show and its streaming service at large.

The untitled Star Wars live-action series does not yet have a release date but the Disney direct-to-consumer platform will launch in late 2019.

Expect more details about the lifespan of Marvel movies on Netflix as Disney gets closer to launching the service, and also keep an eye on if Doctor Strange and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 get their full 18-month tenure on the service... This service will rival Netflix, though Iger has said in the past that it will cost "significantly less" than Netflix.

Overall in the quarter, Disney reported net income rose 23 percent, to $2.92 billion, or $1.95 a share.

Disney said the loss at BAMTech, which was consolidated by Disney past year and which provides the technology for the ESPN+ streaming service launched in April, reflected higher content and marketing costs and ongoing investment in technology.

On an adjusted basis, Disney earned $1.87 per share, below estimates of $1.95 per share.

Shares of Disney, which have climbed almost 9 percent so far this year, slipped 1.1 percent in after-hours trading on Tuesday to $115.45.

Comcast is still locked in a bidding war with Fox for control of Sky, the United Kingdom satellite TV distributor.

Higher programming costs and a fall in subscribers at its ESPN sports channel, meant that the media and entertainment giant's earnings and revenue fell short of Wall Street forecasts. Gains in products related to the Avengers weren't enough to offset lower revenue from "Spider-Man" and "Cars".

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