Infowars' Alex Jones booted from YouTube, Facebook, other services

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Jack Dorsey, Twitter's co-founder and chief executive, said in a series of messages posted Tuesday evening that the social networking service had not suspended accounts associated with Jones, 44, because he had not violated the company's policies. But while YouTube, Facebook, Apple and others have come down hard on the right-wing conspiracy theorist for peddling hate speech, Twitter is standing by him.

The social network announced Tuesday that it would not ban Alex Jones or InfoWars from the site, noting that neither are now in violation of its rules. In a side swipe at the suggestion that numerous bans that have been slapped on Jones and Infowars in recent days have been kneejerk reactions, he adds: "we'll continue to promote a healthy conversational environment by ensuring tweets aren't artificially amplified". "We'll enforce if he does", he said.

"We welcome everyone to express themselves on our service".

"Accounts like Jones' can often sensationalize issues and spread unsubstantiated rumors, so it's critical journalists document, validate, and refute such information directly so people can form their own opinions", Dorsey said. The InfoWars podcasts serve as advertising for a wide range of wellness and survivalism products, making Jones as much as $18 million per year. He pledged to fix that about the platform.

Apple has removed the entire library for five of Infowars' six podcasts from its iTunes and Podcast apps, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Democrat Senator Chris Murphy clashed online with Donald Trump Jr over whether the controversial ban of Alex Jones from social media has signaled a rise of corporate political censorship in the US.

His site Infowars has accused victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting of being "actors" in a plot to discredit the gun lobby.

We didn't suspend Alex Jones or Infowars yesterday.

Several users on Twitter pointed out the seeming inconsistency of Twitter's policies. In a defamation suit filed in Connecticut Superior Court in late May, the families said Jones promotes conspiracies to drive traffic to his website and subsequently sell products to his followers.

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