When to watch the Perseid meteor shower in Manitoba this weekend

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This year, the Perseids will peak at 50-70 meteors per hour.

"All people have to do is count how many "shooting stars" (meteors is the correct term) they see every 15 minutes and send them to Astronomy Ireland's website www.astronomy.ie that night or the next day".

NASA explained: "While observing this month, not all of the meteors you'll see belong to the Perseid meteor shower". That means staying away from urban areas if possible, as light pollution can dominate in cities. Under dark skies, 60 or more meteors are typically seen each hour.

The Perseids have presented a scintillating display for 2,000 years, according to NASA. If you're interested in upping your stargazing game, check out our guide to binoculars and telescopes, as well as how to take professional-level photographs of the stars.

The Perseids get their name from the constellation Perseus, which the meteors seem to come from (they do not actually originate in the constellation). It's a rich meteor shower, and it's steady.

We've rounded up everything you need to know about the Perseids meteor shower, including how and where to watch them. But for those who want to experience the meteor shower amped up to 11, getting to a "dark sky park" is an absolute must. Perseid meteors, caused by debris left behind by the Comet Swift-Tuttle, began streaking across the skies in late July and will peak on August 12.

"If you see a meteor try to trace it backwards". And conditions for viewing the meteors will be next to flawless this year. Meteor showers are a great opportunity for time-lapse videos and long-exposure photography, allowing your shots of the night sky to turn into van Gogh-like paintings of this starry spectacle. During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, casting a shadow on planet Earth.

NASA scientists advise that although they can be seen any time after 10 p.m., the best time to spot a flurry of meteors will be during the darkest part of the night, in the early hours before dawn, from 11 p.m.to first light.

Plus, it's good to give your eyes time to adjust; your peepers can take around 15 to 20 minutes to get used to the dark. Though experts say this eclipse will not be as intense last summer's but if you're in the north, it's worth checking out.

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