Map shows best places to watch weekend meteor shower

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According to NASA, 60 to 70 meteors will be visible each hour.

"The Perseids have been observed for around 2000 years, and are the result of Earth passing through a cloud of dust left behind Comet Swift-Tuttle".

The Perseid meteor shower is already underway.

Accuweather recommends viewers "Lay on your back and watch the whole sky, not just the radiant point, and avoid looking at your phone and other light sources", when viewing the meteor shower. "It is really cool when you think about this as you see the these meteors falling from the sky", remarks Dr Quanzhi Ye, a planetary scientist based at California Institute of Technology, USA.

Created with European data, the map shows how many stars should be visible from any given place, with visibility of stars increasing as light pollution decreases.

"This year the moon is young and will not obstruct the vision, so we will be able to see 100 "shooting stars" an hour", Muhamed Muminovic, a member of the Sarajevo Orion astrological society, told Reuters.

The meteor shower's peak will be visible late Sunday night into early Monday morning.

As the particles, ranging in size from a grain of sand to a pea, hit the Earth's atmosphere at 60km (37 miles) per second, they burn up and streak across the sky.

The Perseids take their name from the constellation Perseus, the constellation from which they are thought to have originated.

A dazzling display of shooting stars lit up the skies of the world last night, with stargazers getting the treat of a lifetime.

You can watch a live stream of the meteor shower below, provided by the Virtual Telescope Project. The days after the peak will also provide nice, dark skies as well!

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