9/11 anniversary: Russian bombers intercepted near Alaska by U.S. fighter jets

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The bombers were accompanied by two Russian Su-35 Flanker fighter jets.

The latest incursion and aerial intercept followed another Russian bomber flights on September 1 and comes as Moscow is engaged in the largest war games in more than 37 years in Central Asia and the Russian Far East.

The Russian jets never entered United States or Canadian airspace, NORAD said, but it didn't give a precise location as to how close they had come. The bombers didn't enter Canadian or USA airspace, NORAD said.

Two US air force fighter jet F-22 of 11 September made the intercept and escort two Russian strategic Tu-95 bombers in the sky just off the coast of Alaska.

During the September 1 bomber incursion, the Tu-95s were not shadowed by Russian jets.

On May 11, US jets shadowed a pair of Tu-95s as they flew in the zone, which extends 200 miles from the coast, in the Bering Sea north of the Aleutians.

Air Force Gen. Terrence J.

Tuesday's incident, which came as Russia and China kicked off massive war games in eastern Russia, marks the second time in a month U.S. fighters have intercepted Russian bombers near Alaska.

"The homeland is no longer a sanctuary and the ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens, vital infrastructure, and national institutions starts with successfully detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft of interest approaching US and Canadian airspace", said General Terrence J. The Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, as first noted by Fox News, released a video Wednesday of two Cold War bombers escorted by fighter aircraft taking off for exercises from an airbase in eastern Russia.

Two Russian bombers were intercepted by two U.S. F-22 fighter jets near Alaska on Tuesday, said the USA military on Wednesday.

Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, the NORAD commander, added, "The homeland is no longer a sanctuary, and the ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens, vital infrastructure, and national institutions starts with successfully detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft of interest approaching U.S. and Canadian airspace".

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