Brett Kavanaugh sworn in as 114th Supreme Court justice

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"It's turned our base on fire", Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Saturday, moments after the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh.

Speaking to reporters aboard Air Force One while flying to a campaign rally in Kansas, Trump said of Kavanaugh: "We're very honored that he was able to withstand this terrible, disgusting attack by the Democrats". "But we're trying to win seats".

Trump also pointed to television footage of protesters outside the Capitol, and said their numbers paled in comparison to the thousands of supporters awaiting him in Kansas.

Trump told a raucous rally in Kansas late on Saturday that the confirmation marked "a tremendous victory for our nation, our people and our beloved Constitution".

A recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll showed in fact that the Republicans have narrowed the enthusiasm gap with Democrats in the past few weeks.

"There were enough other aspects and allegations and reports that we wanted the FBI to investigate", Hirono replied to Bash.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor said the nine justices recognize the small world they inhabit, suggesting that the tense atmosphere surrounding Kavanaugh's nomination is unlikely to be replicated on the court.

That cloud stems from allegations of sexual assault and other inappropriate behavior by Kavanaugh while he was in high school and college, along with his politically charged testimony that labeled the look into his past a political hit job by Democrats.

Every Democrat voted against the Trump appointee, except for Sen.

The 50-48 senate vote marked the end of a bitter, high-profile battle between Democrats and Republicans.

During a rally in MS last week, Trump had mimicked Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, in which she told lawmakers there were details of the alleged sexual assault she couldn't remember. We established the presumption of innocence is so important.

In a separate appearance on CBS News's "Face the Nation", the majority leader predicted that the anti-Kavanaugh protests will backfire by energizing the Republican base in the November 6 mid-term elections, in which the GOP is looking to hang on to its majorities in the House and Senate.

She acknowledged the anguish of the protesters who interrupted the historic Senate vote, telling reporters afterwards: "I was closing my eyes and praying - praying for them, praying for us and praying for the country".

Democrats said Kavanaugh's partisan defense of himself, in which he said he was victim of a "political hit", was enough itself to disqualify him from the court.

At the White House on Sunday, Trump lauded Collins' hard work and "impassioned" speech on the Senate floor Friday announcing how she would vote. Kavanaugh joins Neil Gorsuch, who was confirmed a year ago after a much less contentious process.

The two-vote margin of victory made it the closest Supreme Court confirmation vote since 1881 - and by far the most contentious since Clarence Thomas in 1991. Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

"We must always remember that it is when passions are most inflamed that fairness is most in jeopardy", said Collins, perhaps the chamber's most moderate Republican.

Democratic Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland noted that several key issues framing the Nov 6 vote could all come before a Supreme Court pitched to the right by Kavanaugh's presence.

"I've said to the women who are justifiably angry but determined. they should be just focused like a laser beam on the elections", Hirono added. "I think the people from Alaska will never forgive her for what she did".

Two Republican waverers, Susan Collins and Jeff Flake, finally chose to back the judge.

On a practical level, the four liberal justices need a vote from the right side of the court in which they otherwise divide on the familiar ideological fault lines.

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