Astronauts make emergency landing after Russian rocket fails after launch

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USA and Russian space officials said NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin were safe after an emergency landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure early Thursday of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.

The duo blasted off from Kazakhstan's Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard the Russian Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft.

It was the first serious launch problem experienced by a manned Soyuz space mission since 1983 when a fire broke out at the base of the booster rocket while the crew was preparing for lift-off.

Search and rescue crews were sent to the site of the emergency landing.

After the booster failed, Ovchinin and Hague were forced to make a ballistic descent, coming back to the ground at a sharper angle than normal and causing higher gravitational forces on their bodies.

The failure is a setback for the Russian space program and the latest in a string of mishaps.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said he expected Russian President Vladimir Putin would be briefed on the incident. The crew endured higher than normal G-force, but Russian and USA space officials said they were in good condition.

NASA coordinated a private event at Peabody's Coneburg Inn exclusively for Hague's extended family, sending astronaut Victor Glover to be a personal envoy to the family there.

A United States astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut are alive after a failure during a mission to the International Space Station.

NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, members of the International Space Station expedition 57/58, board the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft prior to launch.

According to Nasa, initial reports are that the crew landed in good condition and got in contact with the space agency.

It's obviously worth noting that the Soyuz rocket is a completely separate piece of hardware from the Soyuz crew capsule, and something like the hole found in the crew capsule now attached to the International Space Station couldn't possibly result in a failure of a rocket booster.

Rogozin said at the time that the problem with the launch of the 2.6 billion-rouble ($39.02 million) satellite had been due to an embarrassing programming error.

"Astronaut Nick Hague of NASA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos launched at 4:40 a.m". The space station and its crew depend heavily on missions supported by the rocket.

The head of Russia's top space medicine center says that two astronauts from the US and Russian Federation are feeling good after an emergency landing.

Ovchinin spent six months on the station in 2016.

NASA says two astronauts from the US and Russian Federation will be flown to Moscow after they made an emergency landing.

NASA chief Jim Bridenstine said his team is working with their Russian counterparts.

Soyuz is one of the oldest rocket designs but also one of the safest.

Russian space officials have said they are investigating whether a hole that caused an oxygen leak on the ISS was drilled deliberately by astronauts. NASA's own transportation system, the commercial crew vehicles under development by SpaceX and Boeing, have yet to take uncrewed test flights to the station, and those are unlikely to occur before early 2019.

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