Dems lead over GOP in new poll days before midterms

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"This is going to be directly related to turnout".

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Barack Obama made dueling election appearances on Sunday, offering sharply different views on the country's problems but agreeing on the high stakes for voters in the final 48 hours of a tight campaign.

Trump is set to campaign Sunday in Macon, Georgia, for Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp and in Chattanooga, Tennessee, for Republican Senate candidate Marsha Blackburn.

By Election Day, both sides are expected to have spent more than $5 billion, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

"It's all about turnout", Senator Chris Van Hollen told "Fox News Sunday", as Democrats wage what polls say is an uphill battle to win control of the US Senate.

For those who say border security is one of their top issues, Republicans lead Democrats by 42 points on the House vote.

But in the first mid-term under Trump - an utterly unconventional president - there are many unknowns, above all the bottom-line impact of a president who has driven both supporters and foes to a rare fever pitch of emotion. "There is a lot of energy out there". But a healthy economy tends to favor the incumbent - and the United States economy has been growing with rare vigour.

Democrats appear hopeful that Trump's histrionics and harsh tongue will convince their voters to come out and vote in large numbers this time and ensure a victory for their candidates to control both houses.

A second poll, by NBC and The Wall Street Journal, also showed Democrats holding the same seven-point advantage over Republicans.

Fifty percent of likely voters say they want Democrats to lead Congress overall, while 43 percent want Republicans to retain the gavels, the poll found.

A fanatical Trump supporter was also arrested on charges of mailing pipe bombs to prominent opponents of the president, including Obama.

But they also will be regarded as a verdict on the President's personal style, ranging from his language (welcome to some ears, intemperate to others), the symbolism he employs (refreshing to some eyes, racist to others), his bearing (bold to some minds, vulgar to others), his recasting of the country's political character (an overdue re-evaluation of US immigration policy to some, a rash of nativist fear to others), even his lifestyle (honest and unvarnished to some, tasteless and tawdry to others).

Republicans, trying to move past that, have been enthusiastically pressing the economic argument. But Trump appears to have put his finger on a very contentious spot in the American mind-space: people are anxious that the liberalism of the Democrats may work completely against the interests of those already living in the country.

Trump is telling the caravans to turn back and insisting they will not be allowed in.

"They must be pretty scared on the Democrat side if they're pulling out the big guns and they have Barack Obama out campaigning", she said.

"There's got to be consequences when people don't tell the truth, when words stop meaning anything".

"The only check right now on the behavior of these Republicans is you and your vote".

"We are seeing that in the early voting in all of these key House and Senate races, and Republicans have been matching, so literally Election Day voting is going to determine the balance of the House".

Opinion polls and analysts have suggested Democrats will attain the 23 seats they need to capture a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives.

FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver weighed in Sunday on whether Democrats or Republicans will control the House after Tuesday's midterm elections.

Trump's job approval rating is basically unchanged from last month's poll among likely voters.

Just five years ago, the Republican National Committee (RNC) reported that the party's very survival depends upon attracting more minorities and women.

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