Conjoined twins ready for separation surgery

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Connected as a mirror image from the lower chest and through their abdomen, Nima and Dawa would be placed on their side during the first stage of surgery, Herald Sun states.

15-month-old Nima and Dawa are happy and healthy after their roughly six-hour surgery today at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, according to the SMH.

But Bhumchu Zangmo has been through 14 months of anxiety after her twin daughters, Nima and Dawa, were born joined together at the torso.

About 36 specialist split into two teams -a team for each child- participated in the procedure and Lead surgeon Dr Joe Crameri said the girls coped very well and have a good chance of full recovery.

"The positioning makes it hard for surgeons Joe Crameri, Tom Clarnette and Michael Nightingale, who are charged with separating the gilrs' shared liver, crossed over bowels and any other internal organs", it states.

The surgery was initially planned for October but was postponed after last-minute checks revealed the sisters were not ready because they needed extra nutritional support.

"There's nothing better with any operation than to be able to go to the parents and say we've been able to look after your child, we've been able to do what we set out to do and that we feel confident that they will be able to recover from this and go forward".

Other funds raised will go towards the twins' rehabilitation and return home.

In 2009, doctors at RCHM successfully separated conjoined Bangladeshi twins, Trishna and Krishna in a 25-hour surgery.

He had previously said that the medical team were prepared for the surgery to take days, but that he realistically envisioned it would take around 6-8 hours.

On Thursday afternoon, the twins travelled to Melbourne from Kilmore, where they have been staying at the country retreat of the Children First Foundation.

If so it would also be divided, he said, and "our challenge will be to reconstruct their abdominal walls to close it over".

She spent Friday praying and meditating.

"We always felt confident that we could achieve this", Crameri told BBC News.

The Victorian government has offered to pay for the procedure and recovery, expected to cost at least A$350,000 (US$254,740).

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