Wisconsin Republicans to vote on stripping power from Democrats

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Nessel, for example, has said she probably will not defend a law allowing faith-based groups to refuse to serve same-sex couples who want to adopt children.

Walker spokeswoman Amy Hasenberg didn't immediately reply to an email seeking comment. Katrina Shankland, a member of the Wisconsin state assembly, accused Republicans of acting like "sore losers".

Walker presided over the ceremony in the Wisconsin Capitol rotunda on Tuesday.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald downplayed concerns and criticism.

"A breathtaking assault on the most basic democratic norm: the willingness of the loser of an election to let the victor rule", wrote Harvard University lecturer and New America fellow Yascha Mounk in a tweet. A high school choir singing Christmas carols was largely drowned out by protesters outside the Senate chamber singing their own anti-Walker tunes.

Meanwhile protesters outside the hearing room are chanting "Shame!"

Walker left without taking questions.

Republicans pushed on through protests, internal disagreement and Democratic opposition to the measures created to weaken both incoming Democratic Gov. -elect Tony Evers and Democratic Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul.

Doyle was governor from 2003 to 2011. "Depends on what they send me", he said.

He slammed the GOP proposals now as "unconstitutional violations of separations of powers". Republicans argue the plan will level the playing field for all communities across Wisconsin.

Republicans are expected to vote Tuesday on bills that would weaken Democratic Gov. -elect Tony Evers and Democratic Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul.

Require Evers to get permission from the Legislature before he could ban guns in the state Capitol.

"Some of this is simply a policy debate", Burden said, "some is reverting back to a prior relationship between the Governor and state legislature". He says the session is "illegitimate" and there will be no rules. Democrats derided it as a cynical attempt to preserve the party's power.

Numerous changes to Evers' power involve rulemaking, giving the Legislature more power over a process that Republicans had concentrated in the hands of Walker over the past eight years.

Despite the furious response, Republicans pressed ahead Tuesday evening - passing their package of bills in the state senate in the early morning hours Wednesday and later in the morning in the state assembly.

The same could happen with the current fight, said Brandon Scholz, a Republican strategist in Wisconsin. A third served under former Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson.

Tony Evers beat Gov. Scott Walker by about 30,000 votes.

But faced with a Democratic governor for the first time in eight years, legislative Republicans came up with a package of lame-duck bills to protect their priorities and make it harder for Evers to enact his.

In Michigan, where Democrats last month won the governor's mansion as well as the races for attorney general and secretary of state, Republican lawmakers introduced measures last week that would water down the authority of those officeholders on campaign finance oversight and other legal matters. Sen.

At the same time, in a seeming acknowledgement that the protests are working, Fitzgerald said that he doesn't yet have the votes for all of the legislation. Evers has said he would like to renegotiate the deal.

The plan would also take away from the governor the power to withdraw the state from a lawsuit, allowing lawmakers to make the decision instead. Tony Evers, a Democrat, defeated Scott Walker, a two-term governor who drew national attention with a brief run for president.

The vote, coming after an all-night debate, was the height of a lame-duck legislative session aimed at reducing the authority of the office Republicans will lose in January.

With governor-elect Evers vowing to pursue legal action if the plan passes the legislature, Wisconsin Democrats continued to voice their outrage at the GOP's patently anti-democratic plan, which mirrors ongoing efforts by Republicans in MI to effectively overturn November's election results.

In a statement Tuesday, Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Executive Director Jessica Post called the GOP lawmakers' actions "shameful".

Republicans did concede a portion of the measure. A plan to move the 2020 presidential primary was set aside.

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