Chinese telecoms giant Huawei sues U.S. over ban

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Guo Ping, rotating chairman of Huawei Technologies Co., said the United States ban was "unconstitutional".

Guo Ping, one of the firm's chairmen, accused the U.S. of smearing the telecoms giant as he confirmed that Huawei would challenge a law that blocks United States executive agencies from using its equipment.

"The US Congress has repeatedly failed to produce any evidence to support its restrictions on Huawei products", he told reporters at a press conference in Huawei's headquarters in Shenzhen.

Canada and China are locked in a dispute over trade and telecoms technology that has ensnared the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies Ltd, the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker, who faces USA criminal charges.

The United States says Huawei equipment could be manipulated by China's Communist government to spy on other countries and disrupt critical communications.

Long before Trump initiated the trade war, Huawei's activities were under scrutiny by USA authorities, according to interviews with 10 people familiar with the Huawei probes and documents related to the investigations seen by Reuters.

Huawei's rotating chairman Guo Ping has said that Huawei has not, and will not ever, implement backdoors in its products, and it will not allow other parties to do the same.

The latest import suspension was completely "reasonable and legal" and aimed at protecting the health and safety of Chinese citizens, said Lu.

In a 13-count indictment, the U.S. Department of Justice accuses Meng, Huawei, and several of the company's subsidiaries of violating sanctions against Iran.

Meng, who is on bail and living at her Vancouver home, appeared in court on Wednesday to argue against the extradition, saying the request was politically motivated.

The NDAA bans the US government from doing business with Huawei or compatriot peer ZTE Corp or from doing business with any company that has equipment from the two firms as a "substantial or essential component" of their system.

Meng's arrest in Vancouver in December on a U.S. warrant infuriated China, which arrested two Canadians days later in what was widely seen as retaliation.

Long before Trump initiated a trade war with China, Huawei's activities were under scrutiny by USA authorities, according to interviews with 10 people familiar with the Huawei probes and documents related to the investigations seen by Reuters.

Huawei has fired the latest salvo in its battle with the USA, confirming it has brought a lawsuit against the USA government over a ban on its telecommunications equipment.

Relations between Canada and China have deteriorated sharply since Meng's arrest.

Huawei executives have continued to insist on the company's independence and transparency.

Turnbull also explained that Australia's decision to ban Huawei and ZTE last summer was carried out to defend the country's sovereignty and as a "hedge against changing times".

The Chinese embassy statement has said that due to "obvious political interference", Canada should refuse the us extradition request and release Meng.

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