Lori Loughlin Released on $1 Million Bond in College Admission Scandal

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When asked if they were okay with making a donation of $15,000, Macy replied: 'Cool'.

One daughter, Olivia Jade Giannulli, who has nearly two million subscribers on YouTube and over a million on Instagram, said in a video that she only went to college for "game days, partying".

If you were an actress on an ABC sitcom that aired at some point in the 1990s, apparently the easiest way to get back in the news is to bribe college officials to let your undeserving kids get into school.

Court papers said a co-operating witness met with Huffman and her husband, actor William H. Macy, at their Los Angeles home and explained the scam to them. "Huffman later made arrangements to pursue the scheme a second time, for her younger daughter, before deciding not to do so".

Macy talked about his daughter's "stressful" college application process earlier this year.

The fraud scheme was run out of a small college preparation company in Newport Beach, California, that relied on bribes to sports coaches, phoney test takers and even doctored photos to land college slots, United States prosecutors said on Tuesday. "But all Federal Bureau of Investigation agents are armed and may draw their weapons as a precautionary measured based on the circumstances during the execution of any warrant", she added.

A judge said on Tuesday that jailed actress Felicity Huffman was eligible for release on $250,000 bond.

Lori and 32 other parents - including her husband, Mossimo founder Mossimo Giannulli - are facing charges of "conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud" for shelling out a lot of Benjamins for their kids to get into elite institutions.

"My daughters are extraordinary women", Macy, 68, told Parade magazine previously.

An FBI source told the celebrity news outlet that guns were drawn as a precaution. Huffman was then taken to a federal building and processed by federal marshals.

Loughlin surrendered Wednesday morning to federal authorities in Los Angeles, FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said.

Loughlin and Giannulli have two daughters, Isabella Rose, 20, and YouTube star Olivia Jade, 19.

The racketeering conspiracy charges unveiled Tuesday were also brought against the coaches at schools including Yale, Wake Forest University, Georgetown and the University of Southern California.

Parents spent as much as six-and-a-half million dollars to guarantee their children's college admission.

Prosecutors say parents paid an admissions consultant $25 million from 2011 through February 2019 to bribe coaches and administrators to label their children as recruited athletes to boost their chances of getting into schools.

In many cases, the students were not aware that their parents had arranged for the cheating, prosecutors said, although in other cases they knowingly took part.

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