Democrat Beto O'Rourke jumps into 2020 presidential race

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'I do. I think I'd be good at it'. "That's part of the problem, and I'm a white man".

Meanwhile, O'Rourke will have to prove that he can keep up the fundraising prowess and grassroots energy that he generated in his unsuccessful Senate run against Ted Cruz.

Beto O'Rourke launched a run on Thursday for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, hoping his message and the fame gained from his unsuccessful election challenge against U.S. Senator Ted Cruz in Texas a year ago set him apart from a diverse field. He visited with students in the key swing state of Wisconsin.

"Amy and I are happy to share with you that I'm running to serve you as the next president of the United States of America", O'Rourke said in a video announcing his candidacy. During the same Iowa campaign event, O'Rourke drew criticism from President Donald Trump for his "crazy" hand movements, according to a report from the New York Daily News.

Of late, O'Rourke has tried to distance himself from some left-leaning candidates, such as Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren of MA, whom Trump has derided as "socialists".

O'Rourke said he will hold a kick-off rally for his campaign on March 30 in El Paso, Texas.

On the day of President Trump's State of the Union address to Congress in February, O'Rourke sat down for an interview with Oprah Winfrey, and said he was thinking about running for president.

The former US representative, who lost to Republican incumbent Ted Cruz in Texas' 2018 Senate race, released a video announcing his candidacy hours before starting a three-day tour across Iowa. But with just three terms in the House and losing his only statewide bid for office, it could lead others to question whether O'Rourke has the necessary experience for the nation's highest office.

US Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, left, and US Sen. He didn't hire traditional political consultants and pollsters, didn't take any PAC money and refused to go negative against Cruz.

Acording to the Post, the former congressman's GOP ties are likely to become an issue as he enters a crowded Democratic presidential primary field that has leaned leftward.

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