Donald Trump tried to 'get rid' of Ivanka from the White House

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After Kelly advised Trump it would be too hard to fire them, the pair allegedly settled on making Ivanka and Jared's lives in the West Wing hard so they would want to resign.

As per the Guardian report, Tillerson also read negative "chatter" about himself in intelligence reports after Kushner "belittled" him to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. In a statement late Monday, Mr. Cohn said: "Ivanka and Jared brought me into the administration".

But Ivanka and Jared, both senior advisers to the president, have outlasted any attempts to force them out of Washington, and Ward writes that Trump's desire to have them gone fluctuates.

The book discusses the upbringings of both Ivanka Trump and Kushner and the initial skepticism by the parents on both sides, mostly for religious reasons, about their marriage, according to The Times.

"They talk to you as if they grew up in an ivory tower, which they did - but they have no idea how normal people perceive, understand, intuit", someone close to the legal team told Ward, adding that they seemed like "the type of people who, if you don't pretty much indicate quickly that you're happy to shove your head up their ass, you're immediately a threat". Welker asked, as the other reporters fell silent.

'She thinks she's going to be president of the United States, ' Cohn says.

Cohn did not end up resigning over that particular incident - he later left as White House economic adviser over a Trump trade policy - but the interaction reportedly changed his view of the Trump children. While still secretary of state, Rex Tillerson reportedly rejected her requests.

Ivanka Trump was reported to want to establish a Trump dynasty to rival the Kennedy or Bush families and that includes becoming president herself.

That's according to a new book by the journalist Vicky Ward that was previewed by The New York Times.

'Get rid of my kids; get them back to NY, ' he told Kelly.

He blamed Ivanka and her husband for his own bad press, and complained they "didn't know how to play the game", according to The New York Times, which recently teased the book.

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