Christchurch shootings: PM announces award for Pakistani hero

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Tarrant was arrested in a auto, which police said was carrying improvised explosive devices, 36 minutes after they were first called.

People from at least half a dozen countries and young children were among the 49 people killed in shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday.

Tarrant, described by Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison as an "extremist, right-wing, violent terrorist", expressed admiration for other violent white nationalists and his intention to "create an atmosphere of fear" and to "incite violence" against Muslims.

Tarrant was also purportedly inspired to commit the mosque shootings by Norwegian far-right terrorist Anders Breivik, who killed 77 people in Oslo in 2011. A couple apprehended at a cordon for carrying firearms not believe to be involved in the attacks, Bush said.

The victims of Friday's shooting included immigrants from Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Two other men remain in custody, although their link to the attack is unknown.

"The magnitude of this is the thing that is the most significant issue for people".

Ardern declined to discuss more details until she'd talked to her Cabinet, the group of top lawmakers that guides policies.

Speaking to CNN in Abbottabad, Dr Alam said his brother was residing in New Zealand for seven years and was a teacher at a university.

Director-General of the Pacific Community (SPC) Colin Tukuitonga also showed his support for New Zealand and those who lost loved ones.

Unlike the USA, the right to own a firearm is not enshrined in New Zealand's constitution.

The terror attack suspect, who live-streamed for about 17 minutes his rampage through two mosques here, is an Australian-born citizen and is a resident of Dunedin, situated around 360 km south of Christchurch.

The AR-15 is a semi-automatic version of the United States military M16 rifle.

The Queen released her own statement about the mass shooting, in addition to the Sussexes and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

Leaders around the world expressed sorrow and disgust at the attacks, with some deploring the demonisation of Muslims. "Unfortunately, we can't claim that New Zealand is a safe place anymore", spokesman for Syrian Solidarity New Zealand Ali Akil told reporters.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who condemned the attack as a "horrible massacre", was praised in the accused gunman's manifesto as "a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose".

Dr Faisal, in a Twitter post, had said that Rashid and his son would be buried in Christchurch for which arrangements had been made with the assistance of Muslim and Pakistani associations in the city.

"Across all religions, our houses of worship are a source of refuge, of prayer, and of love; to see such a heinous and hate-filled act occur in what should be places of peace is the darkest of evils".

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