Going to work on an egg linked to increased heart risk

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It's not specifically the eggs, but the cholesterol in eggs that seems to be the problem, according to a new study.

Dr. Frank Hu of Harvard University noted that most previous studies have shown that eating a few eggs weekly is not linked with risks for heart disease in generally healthy people.

"The fact that studies outside the US appear to show favorable relationships with egg intake and cardiovascular risk may speak to the importance of what other foods are consumed with eggs as part of the overall diet pattern, as recent research has demonstrated the importance of separating eggs from other foods to understand their independent impact on health outcomes", Rubin said in a statement. Risks were found with eggs and cholesterol in general; a separate analysis was not done for every cholesterol-rich food. However, consumption has surged in the past decade as...

The researchers calculated that those who ate 300 milligrams of cholesterol daily - about 1 ½ eggs - were 17 percent more likely to develop heart disease than those who didn't eat eggs. "People who consume less cholesterol have a lower risk of heart disease".

The potential negative health effects of eggs have been up for debate for decades. Also, eating three to four eggs per week was associated with 6 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease and 8 per cent higher risk of any cause of death.

Eating 300 mg of dietary cholesterol per day was associated with 17 percent higher risk of incident cardiovascular disease and 18 percent higher risk of all-cause deaths. Older studies suggesting that link led to nutrition guidelines nearly a decade ago that recommended consuming no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol daily; one egg contains about 186 milligrams.

The evidence for eggs has been mixed.

The researchers examined data from six US study groups including more than 29,000 people followed for 17 ½ years on average. One Chinese study even found that having an egg a day might lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

His bottom line is the same as Allen's: "Eat eggs in moderation".

"We want to remind people there is cholesterol in eggs, specifically yolks, and this has a harmful effect", said Allen, who cooked scrambled eggs for her children that morning. It's a toss-up. Eggs are a good source of nutrients, such as protein and vitamin D, the AHA says. "There is no safe or unsafe amount [to eat] but I do like the saying an egg a day is OK".

So, is there a simple answer to whether you should be eating eggs or not? "Eat them in moderation".

Wright praised the researchers for using a large sample of people, and taking into account unhealthy risk factors, such as saturated fat intake, when assessing the data. The data used in the research was collected between March 25, 1985, and August 31, 2016. Over the follow-up period, a total of 5,400 cardiovascular events occurred, including 1,302 fatal and nonfatal strokes, 1,897 incidents of fatal and nonfatal heart failure and 113 other heart disease deaths. But Norrina Allen says that "we don't know as much as we'd like to about how the cholesterol you consume in your diet is translated into the blood". They can still be part of a healthy diet, but in smaller quantities than many Americans have gotten used to, the researchers say.

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